The process. One of the things about tangling is that it is a meditative process. I focus on each line I draw, and often don‘t have a clear picture of where the over-all design is going. This is particularly true when I select tangles at random, as I did here. Sometimes the over-all design works, and sometimes it doesn‘t. But there are days when the process is what is most important.

Neuron was recently featured as the challenge tangle on a couple of Facebook groups. I didn‘t do this right away, because I wanted to think about how to use the tangle as a string, as I did here. I also wanted to experiment with a few red accents, and I thought the triangles that appear in this design were perfect. I felt the center needed something contrasting, so I chose Nzeppel.

Busy. This tile is from a time when I used complicated strings and lots of tangles. But I think there are some interesting things here, that I‘ve further developed. For example, allowing one tangle to flow behind another. I also followed the string from the Cubine into the Striping. Now days, those concepts are used often when Zentangling, and are specifically taught in classes, tutorials and books! Zentangle drawn on Official Zentangle tile using a black, Micron pen.

Release. We cast the net into the sea, tying it down with ribbons to the world above. The new spores floated away to start their transformation. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Bristol Vellum using a black Micron pen. Tangles: Florz Quib Rixty

Making brown pop. I‘ve tried tangling on various colored papers over the years, and sometimes it works, and sometimes it doesn‘t. I cut a bunch of tiles from a pad of Saint-Armand Canal paper. They are various earthy, neutral colors. But the problem with the paper is that it is both very rough and very absorbant, so it‘s difficult to work with for Zentangles. But, every so often, I get brave and try it again.

A hint of Spring. I wanted to play with the watercolor concept again, but using a more spring-like color palette. I think one of the hardest things to learn for this technique, is to do a little at a time, and to know when to stop. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen. Coloring was done with Tombow, Zig and Distress markers. Accents were done with Distress and Stablo markers.

Simple divisions. The string for this tile was very simple. The space was divided into three sections with horizontal lines. The tile was then divided roughly in half by the vertical line. I did this to remind myself that I don‘t need to have a complicated string to make a pretty design. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen. Tangles: Floo Isochor Linked Tortuca Vega Yincut

Conservatory. For some reason, this tile reminds me of an old-fashioned, Victorian conservatory. I see the tile floor, the elaborate swirls of the wicker furniture and the plants. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen. Tangles: Betweed Bronx Cheer Bucky Floo Flutter Tile Strircles Stiritup Swarm Verdigogh

Something different. I decided to try the current challenge in Eni Oken’s Shading Zentangle Facebook group. This challenge was to imitate the stunning artwork style used by Jo Flaherty. Her work is amazingly beautiful! I tried to keep the tangling simple, with larger shapes and no details. Then I began by drawing a simple line of color with the marker and applying water. I had some issues controlling the color, but I did get the base tones in place.

Imagination. Part of this reminds me of a bird in flight. It sticks in my mind, even though it‘s only a hint. But every time I see it, I can‘t unthink the bird! Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black Micron pen. Tangles: Beadlines Brax Circfleur Flutter Bi Flying Geese Pearlz Phicops Springkle

Hungry? To me, it looks like the Bumper area is a mouth, getting ready to eat the Bronx Cheer. It makes me hungry! Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black Micron pen. Tangles: Bronx Cheer Bumper Cubine Dex Dribbetz Kule Vega Xircus

Hanging around. This is an interesting tile because it‘s pretty weird, in some ways, even for a Zentangle. The string I drew had lots of loops. My thinking was that it would be fun to experiment with. It actually turned out to be kind of difficult to use with the random tangles I had for this day. But, I just went for it and I think it turned out OK in the end!

Joy. This Zentangle makes me happy every time I see it. I like the balance, and many of the tangles are on my list of favorites. Zentangle drawn on official Zentangle tile using a black Micron pen. Tangles: Beedz Bumper Cadent Emingle Fescu Flora Huggins Marasu Nzeppel Pinwheels Sh-Rock

Lesson 2. This is the tile I drew from the instructions in the second chapter in the Zentangle Primer. I‘m not sure that I like Bales, but I tried a different way of shading it on this tile. I‘m also trying to draw my tangles larger, so it felt different to draw the grid this large. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen. Tangles: Bales Jetties Shattuck

Back to the future. Last Friday, a book I ordered recently arrived. It is the Zentangle Primer. Vol 1, by Rick Roberts and Maria Thomas. This book represents the beginning instructions for the Zentangle method. I have never taken a class from a CZT, (Certified Zentangle Teacher,) so I was really looking forward to reading this book. I‘ve wanted it for some time, but the price is pretty steep.