Island vacation. She looked down, out of the window of the raised hut to the cobblestone path and imagined the adventures that were possible here. This Zentangle had a life of it’s own and ended up nothing like it’s original conception! Once of the tangles that came out of the jar was Tuffit. I never know what to do with it, since it kind of looks like a cross between an alien space ship and sofa pillow.

Show time. This tile was drawn from Eni Oken‘s tutorial for the Showgirl tangle. I have to confess, I had a lot of problems with this one. Showgirl isn‘t my favorite tangle to begin with, and I‘m not really happy with the way these came out. But after several false starts, I decided to persevere. I was kind of surprised that the end result is better than I thought it would be.

Inner ocean. Another one by the sea! This tile makes me think of viewing under the deep ocean on a microscopic basis. From single-celled creatures to tiny plants and even prismatic organic elements, they all seem to float towards a net that was cast from a vessel above. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen. Tangles: Angel Fish Black-Eyed Peas Blooming Butter Chillon Locar Tidings Vitruvius Zander

The process. One of the things about tangling is that it is a meditative process. I focus on each line I draw, and often don‘t have a clear picture of where the over-all design is going. This is particularly true when I select tangles at random, as I did here. Sometimes the over-all design works, and sometimes it doesn‘t. But there are days when the process is what is most important.

Triangular. I usually don‘t use straight lines to draw the string on my tile. Here, I decided to use straight lines to make triangular areas on my tile as the basic divisions. I also had a hard time making up my mind, which was the visual “top” of the tile when I was finished, which is why Msst is moving in an uncommon direction. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen.