Bridges. While this Zentangle only has three tangles, it becomes more complex by the overlapping of the various components. It’s as if the Quandu are either bridges or barriers to the Waves. Or, perhaps the Waves choose to go over and under? Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen. Shading done with graphite pencil. Tangles: Printemps Quandu Waves

It’s a string thing. For this tile, I decided to accent the string with ribbon-type tangles and used the fill areas more for texture than for focus. In addition, I did this tangle for a challenge in the Shading and Exploring Zentangle group on Facebook. The focus of the challenge was on the tangle Flovine, which was created by Lin Chiu. It is the last ribbon tangle on the right side of the tile.

Angled. This tile is all about the angles. The string is made up of straight lines set at various angles. The tangles also provide tension due to the placement against the string and each other. The occasional curves help to balance out the rigidity of the lines by providing some softness. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen. Shading done with graphite pencil. Tangles: Deco Border Dyon Jalousie Juke Papyrus Plum Leaf Printemps Scena

We looked up at the ceiling and saw the fan, its blades moving slowly across the light. Blinking, bright, dim, bright, dim, it left us hypnotized on a lazy summer afternoon. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen. Shading done with graphite pencil. Tangles: Antidots Betweed Crescent Moon C-Wing Footlites Nzeppel Orlique Printemps Tropicana

Intensity. This almost looks like something you might see looking in a microscope. Although this Zentangle is very simple with only two tangles, it is also very complex with all of the layering that is happening. It took a while to do, but it was a lot of fun! I ended up breaking the rule I set for myself (white paper, black pen, graphite pencil) by adding the lighter grey Printemps in the background.

Dingbatz. I‘m still trying to wrap my brain around the Dingbatz-style Mookas. I decided to try making them over-sized to see if that made any difference. I kind of like the way tese wrap around to the back of the tile. But After I did them, I realized I should apply the same techniques used for twisted ropes to them. I‘ll have to give that a try here in the future!

Twisted Ropes. This is my first attempt at trying the twisted rope techniques introduced by Eni Oken. I had a small problem with my pink pen… it started puddling and making inconsistent lines shortly after I stared. I decided to carry on with it anyway because I didn‘t want to start my tile over again. It turns out that, IMHO, the blooping pen actually added to the designs.

Blue. I decided to experiment with a blue pen for this tile. I also shaded part of it with a blue colored pencil… after I did the Cirquital with a regular pencil and realized it looked a bit odd. Zentangle drawn on Official Zentangle tile using a blue, Micron pen. Tangles: Barbd Cadent Cirquital Criss & Cross Dex Printemps Sedgling Sez Worms

Back to the future. Last Friday, a book I ordered recently arrived. It is the Zentangle Primer. Vol 1, by Rick Roberts and Maria Thomas. This book represents the beginning instructions for the Zentangle method. I have never taken a class from a CZT, (Certified Zentangle Teacher,) so I was really looking forward to reading this book. I‘ve wanted it for some time, but the price is pretty steep.

Zentangle drawn on Official Zentangle Tile using a black, Micron pen. Tangles: Printemps Nzeppel Chillon Munchin Evoke Echoism

Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol with a black, Micron pen. Tangles: Printemps Cheesecloth Hollibaugh Pokeleaf Marasu Betweed

Zentangle drawing done with Micron pen on Strathmore Vellum Bristol. Tangles: Tink Paradox Printemps W-2 Yincut