There be dragons! This tile is directly inspired by Eni Oken’s Tangled Dragons blogpost. I’ve been wanting to give it a go for quite a while, but just haven’t had time until yesterday. It was a little tricky figuring out how to do the overlapping loops, but I think it worked out well, over all! I think I want to try one with some color next time. Maybe I will try some distress inks with it!

Grace. Mooka is a tangle that illustrates gracefulness in a very simple way. Here’s it’s as if they are dancing in coordinated groups with each other. There is even a main couple surrounded by auxiliary dancers and even some further back on the stage. The goal here was to show a few different ways that Mooka could be use to define and fill space on a Zentangle. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen.

Sugilite is a rare purple cyclosilicate mineral. It was named after the Japanese petrologist, Ken-ichi Sugi, who first identified it in 1944 in Iwagi Islet, Japan. It is found primarily in Japan, Quebec, Canada and at the Wessels mine in South Africa although other deposits have been found since 1977. It is often has inclusions of Richterite (blue) and rusty looking Bustamite. It‘s color ranges from royal purple through fuchsia.

Larimar. Larimar is often goes by several names… the Stone of Atlantis, Stefilia‘s Stone, and Dolphin Stone. This rare, blue variety of pectolite is found only in the Dominican Republic, in the Caribbean. The color varies from white, light-blue, green-blue all the way through deep blue, reflecting all the different colors of the ocean. Like other blue stones, this one is associated with the throat chakra. It facilitates the healing of the mental, and emotional healing of the individual and gives peace and comfort.

Fire. Black opals are the most valuable opals in the world. The most beautiful examples of these come from the Lightning Ridge mining area in Australia. Opals are classified according to the pattern of the fire within the stone. This example is a cross between pinfire and palette. While some lists show that Tourmaline or Pink Zircon is the gemstone for those who were born in October, opal is actually the traditional stone.

Many. There are a lot of tangles on this tile. That‘s because I used a string that had many “sections”. But I think it still works because I repeated a couple of the designs and also used a central, bold tangle. Those framed and anchored the whole thing. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Bristol Vellum using a black Micron pen. Tangles: Afterglow Coil coral Seeds Floating disks Gingham Hurry Mooka Papyrus Sand Swirl

Making brown pop. I‘ve tried tangling on various colored papers over the years, and sometimes it works, and sometimes it doesn‘t. I cut a bunch of tiles from a pad of Saint-Armand Canal paper. They are various earthy, neutral colors. But the problem with the paper is that it is both very rough and very absorbant, so it‘s difficult to work with for Zentangles. But, every so often, I get brave and try it again.

Canal paper I have a pad of this paper that I purchased while visiting Santa Fe a couple of years ago. I liked the neutral tones and thought it would be fun to draw on. It turns out that the texture is a bit rough for tangling, although I made it work. I‘m not sure I like it for shading, or pencil drawing, though. I had a lot of trouble with that part.